comicbookGRRRL Do not offend the chair leg of truth; it is wise and terrible.

16Dec/140

Vector: 2013 in Comics

Earlier this year I was thrilled to be invited to contribute a regular column to Vector, the critical journal of the British Science Fiction Association. My column, Sequentials, is the first time the journal has covered comics and I'm really excited to be a part of that. 

Before my column kicked off proper, the year began with a Best of 2013 issue, so what better way to introduce comics to the Vector readership!

Below then is my look back at the best science fiction comics that 2013 had to offer, with a particular focus on four important comics: Ballistic by Adam Egypt Mortimer and Darick Robertson from Black Mask Studios; The Wake by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy from Vertigo; The Private Eye by Brian K Vaughan, Marcos Martin and Muntsa Vicente from Panel Syndicate; and Raygun Roads by Owen Michael Johnson and Indio from Changeling Studios.

Hit the jump for the full article!

The Private Eye

6Sep/140

The Independent on Sunday – Review of IDP: 2043 by by Mary Talbot, Hannah Berry, Irvine Welsh, Barroux et al

"The Edinburgh Book Festival, which has just celebrated its 30th anniversary, shows that its commitment to promoting graphic novels remains strong by teaming up with the publisher Freight Books, and a dream team of novelists and artists, to visualise Scotland’s future."

I'd been looking forward to this exciting collaboration for quite some time, so I was delighted to be able to review it for The Independent on Sunday last month. It's fairly unusual to see a comic book focused on my home country of Scotland, let alone one of a glorious science fiction flavour.

Edited by crime maestro Denise Mina, this graphic novel features chapters by 2000 AD creator Pat Mills and acclaimed graphic novelist Hannah Berry; artist Will Morris; The Phoenix artist Adam Murphy; author Irvine Welsh and Doctor Who artist Dan McDaid; Mina herself and famed French artist Barroux; and Sally Heathcote: Suffragette collaborators Mary Talbot and Kate Charlesworth.

There are a couple of hiccups, but I make special note in particular of the chapter by Adam Murphy, which is the stand out diamond in an embarrassment of riches.

Read the full review here!

IDP: 2043

29Jul/141

Marvel and DC: Recognising Progress Doesn’t Ignore The Fake Sound Of It

The world of superheroes is a funny old place, home to some of the craziest and most imaginative storytelling of the last century, but eternally trapped in a constantly regressive rut. Long time fans simultaneously demand change and uniformity, for heroes to evolve and remain the same age forever more.

This month Marvel announced three key upcoming changes in its comics line, which was met with familiar outrage and increasing mainstream press interest towards this medium that has given the public their favourite superhero movies. But what was most interesting to many onlookers were not the announcements themselves, but the chosen method of broadcast.

The View, a US daytime talk show, exclusively announced that Thor was to be female in an upcoming title. "It’s a huge day in the Marvel Universe," revealed Whoopi Goldberg. "Thor, the God of Thunder, he messed up. He is no longer worthy to hold that damn hammer of his. And for the first time in history that hammer is being held by a woman."

Cap and Thor

5Jun/140

Uncanny Comics: Interviews, Reviews and Features – Oh My!

Earlier this year, SciFiNow magazine launched a new digital series titled Uncanny Comics. The short monthly mag costs just 69p/99c and combines interviews, reviews (both new and classic), a look at a legendary creator, and an explanation of a comics event. 

My features in Uncanny Comics #4 include a look at the work of Marie Severin, exploring the Final Crisis event, a bio of Doop, an interview with Mike Carey (The Unwritten, Lucifer), and mini-reviews of five of my favourite classic comics. All with direct links to the comics on Comixology and/or Marvel Unlimited as applicable!

Get it now on iPad or iPhone from Apple Newsstand for only 69p/99c.

uncanny4

7May/140

The Independent on Sunday – Review of Sally Heathcote: Suffragette By Mary Talbot, Kate Charlesworth, and Bryan Talbot

The highly anticipated second graphic novel from Costa winners Mary and Bryan Talbot hit the shelves this week, this time with Kate Charlesworth providing art duties, and Bryan having designed the layouts. The Independent on Sunday chose the title as their leading book review.

Mary's first graphic novel, Dotter of Her Father's Eyes, was a biographical affair and Sally Heathcote: Suffragette keeps that historical background while introducing a fictional lead character to move through the events of suffrage and the fight for the women's vote, providing a grounding point for the reader.

It is a brilliant work of art and a fascinating (and meticulously researched) insight to the complexities of the suffrage movement in the UK - hopefully my review will help convince more people to read it!

Read the full review here!

sallyheathcote

3May/140

Uncanny Comics: Interviews, Reviews and Features – Oh My!

Earlier this year, SciFiNow magazine launched a new digital series titled Uncanny Comics. The short monthly mag costs just 69p/99c and combines interviews, reviews (both new and classic), a look at a legendary creator, and an explanation of a comics event. 

My features in Uncanny Comics #3 include a look at the work of Gil Kane, exploring the House of M event, a bio of Machine Man, an interview with Chris Ryall (Editor-in-Chief of IDW), and mini-reviews of five of my favourite classic comics. All with direct links to the comics on Comixology and/or Marvel Unlimited as applicable!

Get it now on iPad or iPhone from Apple Newsstand for only 69p/99c.

uncanny3