comicbookGRRRL Do not offend the chair leg of truth; it is wise and terrible.

18Feb/150

Panel Mania: The Spectacular World Building of ‘The Swords of Glass’

The latest Panel Mania is out and boy is it a good one! Laura Zuccheri's work is jaw-droppingly beautiful and the world building that she and Corgiat have achieved here is first class.

A dying sun, four cosmic swords, and a young girl determined to become a warrior in the name of vengeance. In this alternate world the rich rule over the weak, killing the poor and stealing women. But with the waters rising and the weather becoming more and more extreme, even the privileged find themselves locked in ivory towers to escape the solar wrath.

The oversized deluxe edition of The Swords of Glass (Les Épées de Verre) clocks in at an impressive 212 pages from Humanoids, collecting the complete four books in the series: Yama, Ilango, Tigran, and Dolmon. A chapter for every sword, and all bound in the generously opulent French style.

Once upon a time an artist named Moebius, one of the most influential pop culture icons of the 20th century, founded a comics art group that grew to be the publisher Les Humanoïdes Associés. Publishing infamous magazine Métal Hurlant and plentiful graphic novels by French creative legends, the company also birthed Ah! Nana, an innovative female-led magazine in the late ‘70s.

After troubled times and a resurgence for the industry and publisher, that spirit of equality and diversity is very much alive today in the form of this newly translated epic from Sylviane Corgiat.

The last ten years has been a busy time for the celebrated fantasy and science fiction writer, with Elias Le Maudit (Elias the Cursed) and Lune d’Ombre (Shadow Moon) winning particular acclaim, but it is due to the ethereal and delicate work of artist Laura Zuccheri that The Swords of Glass is such an unmissable treat.

Read the full preview here: The Spectacular World Building of 'The Swords of Glass'

The Swords of Glass The Swords of Glass

The Swords of Glass

10Feb/150

Panel Mania: Ba and Moon Explore Home and Family in ‘Two Brothers’

Oh just a special edition of Panel Mania with a little world exclusive for y'all ;)

A ten-page preview of the upcoming graphic novel, Two Brothers, from Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon, which looks very promising indeed!

Read the full preview here: Ba and Moon Explore Home and Family in ‘Two Brothers’

Two Brothers

9Feb/150

Comics and Human Rights: The Forgotten Women of Comics

At the end of a wonderful week of articles on the LSE Human Rights blog focusing on comics, human rights, and representation, comes my "mic drop" moment - a look at the forgotten women of comics history.

These women were popular, successful, influential and brilliant, yet repeatedly omitted from the history books with the great exception of "herstorian" Trina Robbins.

This is a brief look at just some of those women, built upon my university and ongoing research, and has had an amazing reaction - I'm thrilled!

Read the full article here: The Forgotten Women of Comics

Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger - Jackie Ormes, 1951

Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger - Jackie Ormes, 1951

5Feb/150

Panel Mania: Fashion Forward with ‘Girl in Dior’

This month's first Panel Mania spotlights the upcoming translation of French comics maestro Annie Goetzinger - Girl in Dior.

A love letter to fashion, Paris, and the House of Dior, NBM brings French superstar Annie Goetzinger to conquer the US, following in the footsteps of the titular designer. One of the rare Grandes Dames of comics in France, Goetzinger is well known for her blend of the historical and nostalgic, most often with a societal sting in the tale.

Her works (Agence Hardy, Paquebot, Le Tango du disparu), with their sumptuous Art Nouveau-influenced style, have rarely been translated for the English market, but Jeune fille en Dior perhaps has a wider audience than most – the world of fashion is rarely restricted by mere geographical borders.

Read the full preview here: Fashion Forward with ‘Girl in Dior’

Girl in Dior

31Jan/150

The Independent on Sunday: Review of The Sculptor by Scott McCloud

My interview of Scott McCloud's The Sculptor in tomorrow's Independent on Sunday  is up early on the website, and the graphic novel is an early contender for comic of the year.

"If Understanding Comics was the research, The Sculptor is the finished thesis – far more than the sum of its parts, and a wonderful testament to the power of comics."

Read the full review here - The Sculptor by Scott McCloud: A devilish pact that speaks to every frustrated artist

The Sculptor

26Jan/150

SciFiNow: Review of Brass Sun

The latest issue of SciFiNow Magazine (#102) features my review of Brass Sun by Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard, a brilliant science-fiction clockpunk tale of a real life orrery solar system.

This is a really accessible read, and one I highly recommend to all.

"While the sheer sense of fun and adventure call to mind the works of Ursula K Le Guin, and the early films of Terry Gilliam, the true triumph of Brass Sun is the characterisation of our entire cast. From evil religious tyrants to untrustworthy allies, the secretive monks who run the rails of the clockwork to crazed looking bounty hunters, a terrifying metallic enemy to Wren herself, each character leaps from the page with alarming force."

You can buy SciFiNow via their website, or digitally.

Brass Sun

Brass Sun Brass Sun

Brass Sun