comicbookGRRRL Do not offend the chair leg of truth; it is wise and terrible.

2Jun/150

Panel Mania: Return to Carcosa in Culbard’s ‘The King in Yellow’

It's weird fiction time at Publisher's Weekly this month with a comics adaptation of the infamous The King in Yellow by the magnificent Culbard.

Two masters of horror combine to bring forth the graphic adaptation of the infamous The King in Yellow, a classic piece of weird fiction that promises madness and delivers genuine chills.

Robert W Chambers is the author of the original collection of short stories, and it is the first of these, the tales connected by the titular play, The King in Yellow, that INJ Culbard has brought to life within these pages.

The reputation of The King in Yellow precedes it, influencing such fellow cult creators as HP Lovecraft and Raymond Chandler, and even making ripples last year by frequent reference in HBO’s True Detective. The book within the book, the play at the heart of it all, is hinted at and teased, the book as object never before as dangerous as when rendered fully upon these pages, sat in innocent hands.

Culbard is no stranger to the weird and wonderful, adapting several Lovecraftian tales from At the Mountains of Madness to The Shadow Out of Time, both to great acclaim. Two science fiction highlights of 2014 had Culbard collaborating with writers: the magnificent War of the Worlds inspired Wild’s End at Boom! Studios with Dan Abnett; and the uniquely brilliant Brass Sun at 2000 AD with Ian Edginton.

The artist’s star is rising fast indeed, with last year also seeing his first original graphic novel, Celeste, hitting the shelves to rave reviews. He remains one of the UK’s greatest comic artists with a prolific output – always guaranteeing an intelligent and instantly recognisable graphic read.

Clean lines, bold colors, and characters that wriggle right into the readers’ brain are Culbard’s trademark. Here, in the realm of The King in Yellow, those skills are put to dastardly use as what begins in intrigue ends in poisonous insanity and palpable fright.

Do you dare read it? Do you dare not?!

The shadows lengthen… in Carcosa.

Read the full preview here: Return to Carcosa in Culbard’s ‘The King in Yellow’

The King in Yellow

The King in Yellow

26Jan/150

SciFiNow: Review of Brass Sun

The latest issue of SciFiNow Magazine (#102) features my review of Brass Sun by Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard, a brilliant science-fiction clockpunk tale of a real life orrery solar system.

This is a really accessible read, and one I highly recommend to all.

"While the sheer sense of fun and adventure call to mind the works of Ursula K Le Guin, and the early films of Terry Gilliam, the true triumph of Brass Sun is the characterisation of our entire cast. From evil religious tyrants to untrustworthy allies, the secretive monks who run the rails of the clockwork to crazed looking bounty hunters, a terrifying metallic enemy to Wren herself, each character leaps from the page with alarming force."

You can buy SciFiNow via their website, or digitally.

Brass Sun

Brass Sun Brass Sun

Brass Sun