comicbookGRRRL Do not offend the chair leg of truth; it is wise and terrible.

9Feb/150

Comics and Human Rights: The Forgotten Women of Comics

At the end of a wonderful week of articles on the LSE Human Rights blog focusing on comics, human rights, and representation, comes my "mic drop" moment - a look at the forgotten women of comics history.

These women were popular, successful, influential and brilliant, yet repeatedly omitted from the history books with the great exception of "herstorian" Trina Robbins.

This is a brief look at just some of those women, built upon my university and ongoing research, and has had an amazing reaction - I'm thrilled!

Read the full article here: The Forgotten Women of Comics

Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger - Jackie Ormes, 1951

Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger - Jackie Ormes, 1951

16Jan/150

Review: Henni by Miss Lasko-Gross

In a year already tragically marked by the ever familiar battle between art and religion, freedom of speech and religious (in)tolerance, this fable about faith, identity, and art within an oppressive society from the critically acclaimed Miss Lasko-Gross has been noted as being particularly timely.

It's a tale that will be relevant for a long time to come, commenting not only on fundamentalist beliefs but societal oppression of women, rebellion against repression, and the power of art.

Underground comix star Lasko-Gross is well known for her celebrated semi-autobiographical graphic novels Escape from "Special" and A Mess of Everything (available from Fantagraphics), as well as featuring in the Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women touring exhibition.

Henni cover

29Jul/141

Marvel and DC: Recognising Progress Doesn’t Ignore The Fake Sound Of It

The world of superheroes is a funny old place, home to some of the craziest and most imaginative storytelling of the last century, but eternally trapped in a constantly regressive rut. Long time fans simultaneously demand change and uniformity, for heroes to evolve and remain the same age forever more.

This month Marvel announced three key upcoming changes in its comics line, which was met with familiar outrage and increasing mainstream press interest towards this medium that has given the public their favourite superhero movies. But what was most interesting to many onlookers were not the announcements themselves, but the chosen method of broadcast.

The View, a US daytime talk show, exclusively announced that Thor was to be female in an upcoming title. "It’s a huge day in the Marvel Universe," revealed Whoopi Goldberg. "Thor, the God of Thunder, he messed up. He is no longer worthy to hold that damn hammer of his. And for the first time in history that hammer is being held by a woman."

Cap and Thor

20Mar/140

Issue #One, Scotland’s First Comic Book Symposium

For such a small country, Scotland has long maintained a great influence over the comics industry - at least that part that reads in English at least - from the long-running Beano to modern day maestros Grant Morrison and Mark Millar, not to mention every Judge Dredd and Electric Soup in between.

Scottish comics are thriving, with sold out conventions in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dundee, the first Masters in Comic Studies at Dundee University, and small press success for many.

Yet despite Scotland's illustrious history and a reputation for funding national endeavours, the country lags far behind our European cousins in taking comics 'seriously'. While comics are now winning Costa Awards and elbowing review space in the UK newspapers, the popularity of "wham! pow!" headlines is still high, and negative publicity the more frequent outcome.

This Monday, the Scottish Independent Comic Book Alliance (SICBA) introduced Scotland's first comic symposium, Issue #One, drawing together speakers from academia, the comics industry, and beyond to discuss - with a willing audience - "the future of Scotland’s comic book industry".

issueone

14Mar/140

SciFiNow: Interview with Kelly Sue DeConnick

A great interview with Kelly Sue DeConnick, a look at the return of Captain Marvel, and chatting about the popularity of the Carol Corps.

The crazily busy writer was kind enough to give up some of her time to answer some questions on all things Carol Danvers as the character makes her spectacular cosmic return!

You can read the full features in the current issue of SciFiNow which can also be bought digitally here.

deconnick

18Oct/130

The Guardian: Comic and graphic novel stars take over Kendal for new festival showcase

A new piece up on The Guardian, where I have a chat with superb creators Posy Simmonds, Katie Green, Isabel Greenberg, and Kate Charlesworth ahead of this weekend's Lakes International Comic Art Festival in Kendal.

We look at why they picked the comics medium, the subversive and communicative powers of comics, and how things have changed - and remained the same - for women creators across the decades.

Long-time Guardian favourite and multiple award-winner Posy Simmonds is one such guest, a prolific artist who has been drawing comics since she was a little girl. Her collection last year, Mrs Weber's Omnibus, brought together her long-running strips for the Guardian about a well-meaning middle-class family.

"As a child," Simmonds tells me, "I liked the combination of words and pictures - in bound copies of Punch magazines and, later, in the piles of comics some American kids used to give me. There was also something subversive about comics that appealed - adults didn't approve of them."

Read the full article at The Guardian!

Lakes International Comics Festival